Please lobby to prevent military action against Iran (for Israel)

Please lobby to prevent military action against Iran

Monday, October 24, 2011 6:07 PM
 
From: “Dick Blakney”
 
 
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To Network Promoting Peace with Iran,

If you’ve been following the U.S. political process, you will perceive that the U.S. and perhaps Israel as well, appear to be moving closer toward military action against the Islamic Republic of Iran, which could be catastrophic.
I’m pleased to forward the October 20, 2011 post by Friends Committee on National Legislation (FCNL) in which they launch a lobbying effort to members of Congress regarding relations between the United States and the Iran.  You will see they recommend five course-of-action steps below with details. The FCNL letter is attached, and also pasted in below.

 

The site for the complete FCNL message follows:

http://sz0166.ev.mail.comcast.net/zimbra/h/search?si=10&so=0&sc=55158&sfi=2&st=message&id=366260&xim=1&action=view
I appeal to all of you to conduct maximum leverage of this effort by not only writing your letter of support for this to your Senators and Representative, but also by requesting your friends and contacts to similarly support this move.

In peace,

Dick Blakney
Network Promoting Peace with Iran
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Congress: Diplomacy, Not War, with Iran, Friends Committee for National Legislation, Oct. 20, 2011  FCNL Letter to Congress: Time for Diplomacy, Not War, with Iran: http://fcnl.org/issues/middle_east/fcnl_to_congress_time_for_diplomacy–not_war–with_iran/

Dear Member of Congress,

FCNL is deeply concerned by the clamor by some politicians and pundits to take military action against Iran in the wake of the alleged assassination plot. We call on U.S. policymakers to affirm that war is not the answer with Iran, and that this alarming escalation in U.S-Iran tensions highlights the urgent necessity of establishing a communications channel between the U.S. and Iran.

FCNL urges Congress to reject calls for military action and indiscriminate sanctions, and to press for sustained, direct, and comprehensive negotiations with Iran to prevent violence and to secure lasting solutions to regional conflict and the stand-off over Iran’s nuclear program. We deplore the use of violence, and call on U.S. policymakers to have the responsible parties held accountable in civilian courts.

We recommend the following course of action at this critical juncture in U.S.-Iran relations:

1. Heed Admiral Mullen’s Call: Establish Communication Channel with Iran

Outgoing Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Admiral Mike Mullen has repeatedly called for establishing a channel for U.S.-Iranian communication. His remarks on September 20, 2011 are as relevant today as they were then, warning that without communications channels, there will “extremely dangerous” outcomes:

“We haven’t had a connection with Iran since 1979. Even in the darkest days of the Cold War we had links to the Soviet Union. We are not talking to Iran so we don’t understand each other. If something happens it’s virtually assured that we won’t get it right, that there will be miscalculations which would be extremely dangerous in that part of the world.[…] I think any channel would be terrific.”

2. Conduct Further Investigations of Alleged Plot, Publicizing Evidence

When asked if the “upper reaches” of the Iranian government knew about the alleged plot, Attorney General Eric Holder said on October 11, 2011, “We are not making that charge at this point.” Many Iran experts in the U.S. have raised questions challenging the allegations of Iranian governmental involvement in the plot, including: Robert Baer, veteran CIA operative in the Middle East; Kenneth Katzman, author of a book on Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps and Iran expert at the Congressional Research Service; Gary Sick, Iran expert at Columbia University and National Security Council official for Presidents Ford, Carter, and Reagan and principal White House aide for Iran during the 1979 hostage crisis

Particularly given the many expert opinions noting that the assassination plot is uncharacteristic of the 32-year-old national security strategy of the Islamic Republic of Iran—which has never before been linked to an attack on U.S. soil—this issue clearly warrants further investigation. We concur with former Ambassador Vali Nasr’s call for the U.S. government to “make public all the details of this plot”. All parties responsible for the alleged assassination plot should be held fully accountable to U.S. and international law in civilian courts.

3. Prevent Military Threats, Which Increase Likelihood of Nuclear-Armed Iran

Military action against Iran would likely provoke a full-scale regional war with catastrophic consequences for global security. For years, military leaders and non-partisan analysts have warned that even threats of military action increase the likelihood that Iran will go full speed ahead with its nuclear program.

General Anthony Zinni, former CENTCOM commander, warned that so-called ‘clean’ or ‘limited’ strikes could quickly escalate into a regional war, noting that “the problem with the strike is thinking through the consequences of Iranian reaction…. it will drag us into a conflict. I think anybody that believes that it would be a clean strike and it would be over and there would be no reaction is foolish.”

4. Reject Sanctions that Embolden Iran’s Hardliners, Punish Iranian People

Leading human rights and reform activists in Iran have warned that sanctions only strengthen hardliners in Iran, at the expense of the Iranian people. Nobel laureate Shirin Ebadi said that “We oppose military attack on Iran or economic sanctions because that’s to the detriment of the people.” Leading reformist politicians Mir Hossein Mousavi and Mehdi Karroubi stated in a public letter that “Sanctions have targeted the most vulnerable social classes of Iran including workers and farmers”.

Sanctioning Iran’s Central Bank would likely devastate Iran’s economy and harden nationalist sentiment. As Atlantic Council Iran Task Force-member Barbara Slavin reported, “Sanctioning the Central Bank would punish ordinary Iranians, something the Obama administration has said it wants to avoid, and could undermine what had been a growing international consensus against the Iranian nuclear program.”

5. Reject Oil Embargo Legislation, Which Could Inflict Massive Humanitarian Toll and Cost U.S. $100 Billion

H.R. 1905 and S. 1048 would effectively impose an oil embargo on Iranian exports of petroleum, oil, and natural gas. This bill would impose prohibitively cumbersome requirements that potential purchasers of Iran’s oil would need to satisfy in order to avoid U.S. sanctions, resulting in a de-facto embargo of Iran’s oil. Earlier this year, FCNL joined 12 other national organizations in opposing this dangerous legislation.

UNICEF estimated that the Iraqi oil embargo contributed to the deaths of half a million children, indicating the massive humanitarian toll that an Iranian oil embargo could have.

In addition, sanctioning Iran’s oil exports would, as reported by the Wall Street Journal, “drive up the commodity’s price world-wide and result in higher gasoline prices in the U.S., of as much as $1 more a gallon, even though the U.S. doesn’t import any Iranian oil”. This rise in gas prices could cost U.S. consumers more than $100 billion a year, since, according to the New York Times, “ …typically, every one-cent increase in the pump price of gasoline takes more than $1 billion out of consumer pockets over a year.”

We strongly urge Congress to reject calls for military action and indiscriminate sanctions, to establish a channel for communications with Iran to avert further violence, and to hold all parties responsible for the assassination plot accountable in civilian courts.

Sincerely,

Diane Randall
Executive Secretary

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US Begins Huge Military Manuevers Aimed at Iran

http://america-hijacked.com/2011/10/17/us-begins-huge-military-maneuvers-aimed-at-iran/

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